Description

Recently upgraded with a new set of speakers, this is my hifi system in my living room.  The room is far from perfect, but it's not terrible either.  Been dialing in the speaker position recently.
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Room Details

Dimensions: 0’ × 0’  Small
Ceiling: 0’


Components Toggle details

    • Lyra Delos
    MC phono cartridge
    • Michell Engineering Tecnodec
    Turntable
    • Wilson Audio Sophia mkII
    • Cardas Audio Cross
    Speaker Cable
    • Devialet Expert Pro 220 Core Infinify

Comments 31

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222222&text=ma
Owner
Reme, do you think my power cords are a priority over my interconnects?  I was led to believe that my interconnects are relatively inferior, but my power cords are at a higher level.  Thoughts?

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
Threaded Rod Specs:
36" Tall x 1" Diameter, 8 Threads per inch (TPI)
Material: Stainless Steel
While I did not purchase here, this is a link to nearly the identical product:
http://www.mcmaster.com/#98847a038/=10p76wl

The nuts and washers are chosen after you choose the rod, and it's just a matter of looking at the offerings and doing a bit of basic math.

I strongly recommend stainless over other steel types.  You do not want tour audio shelf rusting!

- Mark

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
By popular demand, here are the rack dimensions.  Thank you all for the compliments, my OCD mixed with a bit of creativity paid off!

Shelves:  2 feet x 8 feet x 1.75 inches

Placement of the holes for the steel rods:
3.5 inches from the the front and rear shelf edges to the center of the hole; 12" from the sides of the shelf to the center of the hole.  I don't recall the hole diameter, but all you have to do is make it large enough for the rod to pass with plenty of clearance, and be sure that the outer diameter of the washer has plenty of overlap.  Very hard, thick hardware is a must as you will be tightening the nuts with extreme force, and the weight of the shelves is significant.

Good Luck!

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
Thanks Triofan, the sky is the limit with wood choice on this shelf design, or I may say, the forest is the limit! Check out the Jenka hardwood scale.

I love the Delos, but  I guess what I really mean is, I love my analog front end. Since I have changed pieces here and there, I never really got to A:B test the Delos against other cartridges, but the cartridge, table, and phono pre taken together sound excellent. I prefer it to my digital rig hands down.

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
You're welcome, the wood is just one type, all black walnut.

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
To respected_ent:  send me an e-mail:  [email protected]

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
The speaker stands are made by or provided by Lockport Technologies, and sold with their Mira Monitors, which are no longer produced.  Rockport now only has floor standing speakers.  I think if you e-mailed Lockport, they may give more info on the stands from the Mira Monitors.  They are extremely heavy, have spiked feet, and I would recommend them!

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
Wow!  so many people like this rack, I should begin selling them!  If you have no intention of making one, I can make one for you.  It will be custom made and not exactly cheap, but it will be really well done!

For those who want to try it, here is how I made it:

First, decide the length and depth of the shelves.  I considered the size of my components, and that I wanted 3 components per shelf, with room to spare.  I also considered the length of my wall and room on the left & right for the speakers.

I had my shelves made in thick, dense, black walnut by a wood worker.  The shelves were joined like any table top.  The wood worker I used makes great stuff and has good attention to detail.  This type of work for a guy who makes tables or other furniture should be a breeze and potentially not very expensive.  A local cabinet maker is also a good place to inquire.  For weekend warriors, I would not recommend joining the shelves yourself.  You will never achieve the level of perfection as one who does this regularly and has the proper tools and space.

I believe my shelves are 1.75” thick.  The thicker the better - they look really great.  I think that thick edge really makes the piece that much more attractive.  You can use any type of wood, and you do not need particularly thick pieces for joining.  Good technique and wood glue make a great joined piece, stronger even than a single plank.  I have crawled on and kneeled on my rack several times.  Black walnut is quite attractive and quite hard on the Janka scale, though not as hard as some varieties of Maple.  Mine is natural in color, no stain at all, just oiled, and finished with a furniture wax.

I then asked the wood worker to make holes with a drill press at precise locations that I drew on a schematic for the threaded rod to pass through.  You have to look at what washers and rod you will use first to be able to properly specify the diameter of the holes to be drilled.  The holes need to be larger than the rod, and smaller than the washers.

Finally, I used very thick stainless steel threaded rod (1" diameter), huge stainless steel nuts (huge nuts, he-he-he), and stainless steel washers (2" outer diameter).  Stainless adds a lot to the cost of the threaded rod and parts, but I live in a humid climate and I do not want any surface rust on the audio shelf!  Not only that, the Stainless parts have a more refined look than other grades of steel.  The McMaster Carr website is a good starting point for the rods and hardware, but I ended up buying locally at an industrial tool shop.  

If you zoom into the photo, you can see the construction method - it's pretty simple.  All you need is 2 big, cheap, adjustable wrenches and a level to assemble the rack.  Be sure the shelves are perfectly level, and then tighten the opposing nuts as tight as possible.

Finally, I drilled some holes in the back (using a hole saw attachment for a drill) behind the main 3 components on the center shelf to be able to use for cable management.

I am sure there are ways to improve this design.  I considered using some dampening material in between all of the washers and the wood, but quality dampening washers are very pricey, and the tightness of the nuts may diminish the benefit of dampening material, so I skipped it.  The shelf does not seem very resonant, but I have no way of really knowing if that statement is very true.

Good Luck, and feel free to ask any questions.  

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
Thanks ambrorow, the bridge print is one of my own from a collection.  You can see the others on my website here: http://www.marktomaras.com/highway-bridges-gallery#1

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
Thanks!  Yes, I made the stand myself.  It is 3 pieces of joined black walnut with holes made with a drill press, connected with heavy duty stainless steel rod.

marktomaras

222222&text=ma
Owner
Thanks Waveman!  I need to update the photo, I have recently installed proper spikes on the base of the speaker stands.  That, and the lens I used for the posted photo has a lot of distortion on the speakers, they look squashed!  More photos to come...

marktomaras